Food & Beverage
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Five Fun Facts You May Not Have Known About Coffee

Thursday, April 25, 2019

Coffee has become such a morning staple that a lot of people claim they start their day without a freshly brewed cup. Without a doubt, coffee is the world’s most popular drink with over 400 billion cups consumed each year. an industry so big that nearly 25 million farmers around the world rely on coffee for their livelihood. Because of this, coffee is the world’s second most valuable exported commodity next to oil—and in case you were wondering, the global coffee industry earns an estimated amount of USD 60 billion in a yeari.

But give the serious stuff a break first and focus on some interesting and fun facts that you may not have known about your daily brew. 

1. The word “coffee” actually means “wine”.

If we trace back the etymology of the word “coffee”, research will show that it was derived from the Arabic word qahwa, which literally translates to “wine of the bean”. However, it can also refer to the origin of coffee, which was in Kaffa, a region in Ethiopiaii.

When the Turkish discovered coffee, they had a challenging time pronouncing qahwa, which led them to calling coffee kahve, and finally, in 1600, the Dutch coined the name from what we now know coffee to be—koffieiii.

 

2. The largest cup of coffee was filled in a 9-foot cup.

According to the Guinness Book of World Records, the largest cup of coffee was filled in a 9-foot cup at the Honduran Institute of Coffee last 18 November 2018. It contained 18,012.07 litres of coffee, and 22 hardworking people worked over a month to create and construct the perfect ceramic vessel to hold the coffeeiv.

3. An 8oz cup of coffee contains less than five calories.

An 8oz cup of freshly brewed black coffee contains less than five calories, which is why dieticians advice people looking to lose weight to enjoy their coffee straight-up blackv.

What makes the coffee fattening or loaded with calories are the add-ons to make it tastier. All those creams, sugars, and syrups can instantly hike up a cup of coffee’s caloric count from less than five to over 400.

 

 

4. You can actually eat coffee cherries as food.

Because we are so used to having coffee in its beverage form, we often forget that it is a fruit. According to people who have tried it, the skin is quite snappy and firm, and when pierced through, yields a pulpy, sticky, and sweet layer. The taste is a combination of rosewater, watermelon, and hibiscus all in one bitevi. And given their energising benefits, people in the early days used to mix coffee berries with fat to create a snack ball that’s bursting with caffeinevii.

 

5. You can repurpose coffee grounds and use them to beautify your skin.

Because coffee contains a lot of antioxidants, you can save those grounds after your brew and use them to make a DIY beauty scrub. According to Danusia Wnek, a beauty chemist from Good Housekeeping, coffee grounds act as topical exfoliators that lift off dead skin cells. As a result, the skin feels smoother and looks brighterviii.

A popular legend says that coffee was discovered as early as the 9th century by goat herders who ate the fruit of the coffea plant and started to dance. After a monk heard about this, he made a drink from the plant’s produce, which kept him awake long into the eveningix. These are just a few fun and interesting facts about coffee, and we hope this article perked you up just like your morning cup!

 


 ihttps://recipes.howstuffworks.com/coffee-facts.htm

 iihttp://www.anthropologyinpractice.com/2010/07/trail-of-coffee-beans.html?m=1

 

 iiihttps://www.etymonline.com/word/coffee

 

 ivhttp://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/world-records/largest-cup-of-coffee

 

 vhttps://www.livestrong.com/article/307048-does-coffee-contain-any-calories/

 

 vihttps://drinks.seriouseats.com/2011/02/what-does-a-coffee-cherry-tastes-like.html

 

 viihttp://www.pbs.org/food/the-history-kitchen/history-coffee/

 

 viiihttps://www.goodhousekeeping.com/health/diet-nutrition/a30303/facts-about-coffee/

 

 ixhttp://www.ncausa.org/About-Coffee/History-of-Coffee